EcoBreeze House / A+ Architects

EcoBreeze House / A+ Architects

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Is it possible to bring the breath of nature into a house amidst the bustling city? EcoBreeze House is a rare project with a relatively large design area, located in the heart of Ho Chi Minh City where houses are often closely built together. With this advantage, the design team aims to create a house that is closely connected to the nature and climate of Vietnam. Here, the house itself can “breathe”, creating a living space that is intimate with the surrounding environment.

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This project brings a fresh approach as the homeowners have chosen to use a steel structure instead of conventional reinforced concrete. Additionally, they desire to incorporate a significant amount of wood materials to create a harmonious living space with nature. We also pay great attention to the principles of feng shui. Specifically, the kitchen is positioned in a location without any other functional spaces above it and is tilted 45 degrees compared to the main direction of the house.

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To meet the homeowners’ needs, this project has implemented an intelligent solution called the “Double Skin Facade.” This structure consists of a thermal wood louver system (wood that has been thermally treated for increased durability) on the outside, combined with an inner sliding glass system. The entire system is securely fixed to a robust steel frame. It can be considered a two-in-one solution, addressing both the factors of sunlight and wind while incorporating the principles of feng shui. As a result, the house can fully demonstrate its “breathable” characteristics.

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Imagine a house without boundaries between nature and humans. On the ground floor, auxiliary spaces have been pushed to the side, creating a garden that occupies over 45% of the land area, surrounding three sides of the main functional area. Here, the entire family can interact with nature horizontally.

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Moreover, integrating nature goes beyond just the horizontal aspect; the vertical aspect must also be considered. Therefore, the kitchen is moved to the center of the main functional block on the ground floor, combined with an overhead skylight to create a perfect vertical axis that connects with nature. This space resembles a miniature natural environment, allowing native trees with large canopies to thrive and sustainably grow.

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Each functional space within the house has its own story, and the first-floor corridor is no exception. The wooden flooring in the corridor creates a warm and cozy feeling when used. This corridor also serves as a transportation system connecting the bedrooms and the shared living space on the first floor. Even during rest time, people can still wish each other a good night’s sleep through the void space.

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As designers, when we approach this project, our utmost desire is to share the most familiar aspects of Vietnamese culture and climate. Here, there is no longer a separation between humans and the native nature. Children can freely play within the house while still experiencing the distinct movements of the surrounding enviroment. All of these elements contribute to the creation of a unique project like EcoBreeze House.

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